The story of Sanity Has Left the Building

I went to college to study architecture and while in school I would doodle comics to make light of the stressful situations. During my freshman year I created my first humorous piece as a T-shirt concept for the AIASF x USFCA club. This design, unfortuately, was never made into a T-Shirt. (I also somehow drew this in photoshop since I didn’t know autoCAD or illustrator at the time).

 T-Shirt Concept for the AIASF X USFCA Club

T-Shirt Concept for the AIASF X USFCA Club

I’ve always seen architecture architecture school as being over-the-top. It was a lot of fun, but it was also kind of ridiculous what people (including myself) thought was necessary in order to do well.

Sanity Has Left the Building was originally conceived as series of shorts that would parody architectural pedagogy and studio culture. However, I found it difficult to find time to gather actors, write, and record, so the idea took a back seat for a while. I doodled throughout college, but there was no real development in the SHLTB series until my senior year.

 Lots and lots of sketches

Lots and lots of sketches

During my final year at USF, I had the opportunity to come up with a creative idea to illustrate various themes in our architectural theory class. We could take a photo, draw a picture, read a poem, write a song, etc. It didn’t matter what format we chose as long as it related to the topic at hand. My medium of choice was ink and watercolor and I created various comics sketches under the title “Sanity Has Left the Building.”

  Ornament and Crime (Adolf Loos) - Original Comic

Ornament and Crime (Adolf Loos) - Original Comic

Ultimately, I thought to myself that this might actually be a fun thing to do on the side. I did not pursue this idea, and ended up forgetting about it until I graduated. Now that I’m 6 months out of school, I’ve been delving deeper into all the various facets of my interests and inquiries. This project is a challenge to myself to see if I can make architecture humorous and relatable to everyone - especially non-architects. My goal is to show how architecture school is just as challenging as every other program - and that it’s time for some long overdue re-assessment of architectural pedagogy, professional development, and roles within the profession.